Research and Extension Centers

The Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Centers: Concentrating Resources to Better Serve Texas

The Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Centers came into being as part of a concerted effort to best serve the residents and agricultural producers within the distinctive regions of the state, with their unique agricultural commodities, urban and rural communities, regional soil types, and environmental conditions. Fourteen AgriLife Research and Extension Centers provide trained personnel to meet those specialized needs. The establishment of the Research and Extension Centers became a matter of planning and policy in 1965, but many such “centers” had in reality come into being long before then, since the concept is closely aligned with the original intent and traditions established by the Morrill Land Grant College Act of 1862, the Hatch Act, and the Smith-Lever Act, combining teaching, research, and extension.

As members of The Texas A&M University System, the 13 centers serve their region and community by providing the spectrum of scientific and informational resources available from Texas A&M AgriLife Research, the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, and the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences — and beyond. When the needs of the community cannot be met with local resources, the Research and Extension Centers draw on the expertise of the broader land-grant community and federal agencies such as the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service and Natural Resources Conservation Service and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. AgriLife programs are also closely interwoven with agricultural commodity groups, local and state agencies, and philanthropic organizations. The AgriLife Research and Extension Centers provide benefits to Texans and Americans wherever they may be.

Research and Extension Centers

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